Charles Caleb Colton: Lacon Or Many Things in Few Words

Charles Caleb Colton: Lacon Or Many Things in Few Words

Melrose Books

Lacon: Or Many Things in Few Words was first published in 1821 and was released in numerous editions until the early 20th Century. Written by the Rev. Charles Caleb Colton, "A man of great intellect and energy", extracts from the work are widely quoted by modern writers but as yet there have been no new editions for many years.

The main body of Lacon is a series of aphorisms that comprise anecdotes and witticisms on various aspects of human existence.More...

Lacon: Or Many Things in Few Words was first published in 1821 and was released in numerous editions until the early 20th Century. Written by the Rev. Charles Caleb Colton, "A man of great intellect and energy", extracts from the work are widely quoted by modern writers but as yet there have been no new editions for many years.

The main body of Lacon is a series of aphorisms that comprise anecdotes and witticisms on various aspects of human existence. The reader will find a wealth of fascinating material that is not in any way diminished by age and remains relevant to the modern reader. Each aphorism speaks with a rare truth and wisdom, and often with great humour. Many of the aphorisms in this 183 year old work will resonate and ring true as much today as they ever did. It is no coincidence that this Victorian gentleman is one of the most widely quoted on the Internet.

In this new volume the Editor, George Barbour, has presented us with some of the most entertaining and relevant parts of the original Lacon along with a introduction to the author and an article written during Colton's life. Barbour's sensitive and light-handed treatment of the text provides an accessible route into Colton's wisdom, whilst preserving the majesty of the original for future generations of "those who think".

Quotations

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We hate some persons because we do not know them; and we will not know them because we hate them.

Page 62

Examinations are formidable things, even to the best prepared, for the greatest fool may ask more than the wisest man can answer.

When you have nothing to say, say nothing; a weak defence strengthens your opponent, and silence is less injurious than a bad reply.

Mystery is not profoundness.

Page 30

Friendship often ends in love; but love in friendship - never.

Page 58

True friendship is like sound health, the value of it is seldom known until it be lost.

Page 137

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